Posted by and filed under Uncategorised.

Banbury, UK. The British Racing & Sports Car Club (BRSCC) and Base Performance Simulators (BPS) have today announced a partnership, which sees BRSCC racing members benefitting from discounted simulator sessions to help them prepare for the season ahead.

 

Of the recent partnership, Nick Boaz, General Manager of BPS, said “We are delighted to work with the BRSCC and its members.  The BRSCC has been one of the most influential clubs & main driving forces in domestic and international motorsport. We know the members will find our simulators to be the perfect tool for race preparation, track familiarisation and driver training  across the season”

 

Scott Woodwiss, Sales and Marketing Executive of BRSCC said “Creating a link with a company such as Base Performance Simulators shows that the BRSCC continues to be forward thinking. In this day and age, more and more drivers of varying levels of age, experience and performance across motorsport are turning to simulator training and practice as a cost-effective method of continuing to develop their abilities. We’re confident that BPS and their expertise will help enhance the performance of our Racing members further as they continue to prepare and improve both ahead of and throughout their 2018 championship campaigns and beyond.”

 

If you are a member of the BRSCC and would be interested in simulator sessions for the season ahead contact us here.

 

About BPS 

Base Performance Simulators provides motorsport simulator packages in both GT and full-motion single-seater systems, using the very latest market-leading Cruden technology. Founded in 2009 by Triple Le Mans-winning Aston Martin factory driver Darren Turner, the company has grown to cover many aspects of motorsport simulation including manufacturing and sales, simulator rental at their Banbury headquarters and corporate events.

 

About BRSCC 

The British Racing & Sports Car Club was formed in 1946. Today, with over 50 race meetings and 25 championships under the BRSCC umbrella annually, the Club continues to play a leading role in the British motor racing scene, organising both club race meetings and FIA sanctioned international events.

 

For Release: 04/04/18

Lucy Woodbridge                                                                                         

+44 (0) 1295 276611

lucy@baseperformance.net

 

If you are a member of the BRSCC and would be interested in simulator sessions for the season ahead contact us here.

Posted by and filed under Meet the team.

We’ve been a bit busy of late, so we’ve added yet another member to our team. Lucy brings a fresh enthusiasm and never ending cups of tea to the BPS office as our Sales & Marketing Executive.

How did you come to work at BPS?

I had a desire to get involved in the motorsport industry once leaving university. I studied International Marketing in London and had just graduated. I came across the BPS stand at the Motorsport Industry Association Jobs Fair just after I graduated in September. After an long informal interview with Ella, I was offered a full time position to help with the expansion of the BPS.

What does a typical day at BPS entail for you?

To be honest, no two days are the same here at BPS, which is exactly why I like it here. If it’s not posting on our social media channel, or booking in one of the many wonderful clients we get here, then we’re busy planning the next show in the ever expanding schedule (as well as some top secret stuff you’ll find out in the new year… watch this space!)

What do you think makes BPS different from other companies?

We’re small enough so we can ensure our clients always get the best experience, yet large enough to keep up with the ‘big boys’. The team seems to cope with any complicated, vast task that’s thrown our way. What I love is the fact we are always re-evaluating and improving everything we do; when we want the best software we will make sure we partner with the best software company in the business. When we want to make sure we have top notch communications systems we trial and compare all of the best packages to see what works best for us.

What is the best day you’ve had at BPS?

Easy – when I got to try out the GT and single-seater simulators for the first time. I have a secret nerdy past of gaming on, what I thought were ‘simulators’, but as soon as I stepped into a BPS simulator I suddenly understood why professionals come here. It genuinely feels like I’m on a track.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

I absolutely adore travelling. Whether it be planning my next big adventure far away, or even a nice walk somewhere closer to home, it’s safe to say I have rather itchy feet so will be off somewhere when I’m not in tropical Banbury.

What is the one piece of advice you’d give to your 15 year old self?

Always keep a cool head and think smart. The amount of times you see people, even when they’re old enough to know better, getting themselves in a flap over things that, in retrospect, aren’t as bad as they first thought. When hit with something daunting… stick on the kettle. Quite often a tea and a biscuit can solve life’s problems.

Quick fire round

Tea of coffee?

Tea

Single-seater or GT?

GT

Favourite Track?

Thruxton (my first ever real-life circuit I drove on!)

Favourite car?

1953 Jaguar XK120 (I am so old school).

Favourite workshop radio station?

Radio 6

Posted by and filed under Meet the team.

Newest recruit to Team BPS is Simulator Engineer David Waters. He is our secret weapon on the ever-moving fight against updating circuits and cars.

How did you come to work at BPS?

It all started when I decided to have a go at making a model of Buckmore Park kart circuit for rFactor. I’d never done any 3D modelling before but I had a go anyway. When the track staff saw what I was up to they offered to pay me to complete it. At the time I had just started university and was studying Motorsport Technology, so my degree tied in nicely with what I was doing. Once I graduated, I was offered a full time position as simulator engineer. Just over a year later, and now I’m working at BPS in a similar capacity.

What does a typical day at BPS entail for you?

The job is extremely varied, which is a big part of why I like it. One day might be coaching a driver in the simulator, the next might be modelling a car or track for a client, and then the day after might be a simulator installation at somebody’s house. No two days are the same.

What do you think makes BPS different to other companies?

BPS is a very small company, which I really like – it means that the work I do has a big impact on the company, which keeps me motivated to do the best job I can all of the time. It’s also good to work with a team of people who all have similar interests. I grew up in a football-loving family, in a county with no race tracks, so I still love coming in on a Monday and being asked “did you see the MotoGP at the weekend?”

What is the best day you’ve had at BPS?

A couple of years ago I would have never thought I’d find myself saying this, as I always used to be quite shy, but I enjoy days where I get to work with drivers who can learn something from me and who subsequently improve their technique. Coaching drivers is really satisfying and has also resulted in me gaining a lot of confidence.

What do you do when you aren’t at work?

Racing, obviously! I try and get some karting in now and then, and my weekends pretty much revolve around what motorsport is on. Other than that, I have just moved into a house with my girlfriend who hasn’t got a practical bone in her body, so I end up doing all of the DIY and getting rid of spiders!

What is the one piece of advice you’d give to your 15 year old self?

Don’t worry about the people around you and what they think – you won’t even live within 100 miles of them in 5 years time.

Quick fire round!

Tea or coffee?

Neither, but thanks for offering!

Single-seater or GT?

GT

Favourite track?

Probably Thruxton or anywhere where there is only grass and/or gravel the other side of the white lines.

Favourite car?

Lotus Esprit, but I’m partial to anything from the 90s with popup headlights.

Favourite workshop/office radio station?

Planet Rock

Posted by and filed under Meet the team.

For September’s edition we sit down with an integral part of our management team and Chief Tea Brewer – Nick Boaz.

How did you come to work at BPS?

I have been on the spanners in the motor trade (long time ago now) and in motorsport my whole life but I’ve always loved racing. I had stopped a going racing a couple of years before coming to BPS to be at home more and enjoy other things in life. However life if an F1 factory was not my cup of tea. I replied to an ad here and the rest is history,

What does a typical day at BPS entail for you?

I make sure everything on the technical side of the business get done, so a lot of delegating, sorting technical issues, keeping on top of maintenance of our own sims, stock control, purchasing, liaising with suppliers and so on. I will sometimes run customer sessions too, and I always seem to make the tea!

What do you think makes BPS different to other companies?

It’s a very small and personal company. Everyone here has a lot of responsibility in their different areas so there is no slacking.

What is the best day you’ve had at BPS?

The first time I managed a full lap of the Nordschleife on our GT sim without crashing!

What do you do when you aren’t at work?

Too much! I have an MX5 weekend toy that I’m prepping for track use. I am training to run the 10 mile Great South Run later this year. My sister inspired me to do it… I have recently finished refurbishing my house, and as a novice property entrepreneur I am often found reading property investment books or searching Right Move. I am involved in a great car show called Benz On The Green, preparation for this seems to take all year, but we raise thousands of pounds for the Ben charity so it’s very satisfying. Apart from that, I like watching Top Gear on Dave.

What is the one piece of advice you’d give to your 15 year old self?

Learn how to be a city trader then you can be the one racing an Aston Martin.

Quick fire round!

Tea or coffee?

Tea. Milk no sugar. Earl grey is a nice treat. Green tea first thing in the morning.

Single-seater or GT?

GT.

Favourite track?

That I’ve been to; Laguna Seca. Or Spa. Or Monza because of the crazy fans. Or Nordschleife because it is better than anyone can describe. (sorry, can I have 4?)

Favourite car?

Eh? That’s an impossible question to answer! Mercedes E63 bi-turbo estate. Practical. Mental. In equal measures. Or Ferrari F40. No, McLaren F1. I don’t know… Oh wait – Zonda. No, I’d park it in my living room and just stare at it. Yes, any of those…

Favourite workshop/office radio station?

Radio 2. Best score on Pop Master is a poor 12.

Posted by and filed under Guest blog.

Whilst indulging in our regular Friday treat of fish and chips, Team BPS often has whatever Friday practice session is running on the TV. When a grand prix weekend provides us with our lunchtime entertainment, it is usually accompanied by some light-hearted debate about the future of the top rank of “our” sport. Our team is made up of a few members with direct experience of an F1 weekend, some more used to an armchair view. For this month’s blog we’ve pulled together some of these avec-lunch views to create the “BPS manifesto for F1”. Obviously it comes with the disclaimer that we have an only slightly above average knowledge of the highly commercial and technical world of F1, and this is purely a collection of non-connected ideas that we believe could make the sport more sustainable and entertaining. By no means are we trying to start a political campaign, claim these are entirely unique ideas or making an extremely low-rent bid for a job with the FIA.

rFactor 2016-08-15 16-35-11-85_01-1

Reset the rules (and keep them that way)

The imbalance between the little and large teams within F1 is not going to change unless the slate is wiped clean. A new rulebook would go some way to neutralising the grid again. We’d then keep the rules stable to allow the costs of the changes to be absorbed over a three-year period.

Reuse and recycle

We’d also suggest that there is a three-year cycle for each basic chassis design. Again a cost-cutting measure. At the start of the year each team would have to homologate a low, medium and high downforce setting, to try and prevent expensive and wasteful one-use wings

Give new talent a try

We want three car teams – with the third seat taken up by a rookie. By rookie, we mean they’ve got the mandatory superlicence and have completed less than fifty percent of a F1 season. This car would be eligible points, and could be last-season spec for those teams who are more have more budgetary challenges.

Return to the classics

This one is a unanimous verdict from across the team. We only need 16 races a year, however they need to be at awesome venues with heritage. We want great racing and full grandstands, and to reminisce about battles gone by whilst speculating about the next.

Free the reigns

Too many incidents end up being resolved in race control. Not every bang of wheels warrants a trip to see the head teacher. This attitude is creeping into other parts of motorsport – lets cut down on the penalties and protests and sort things out on the track.

Engage the audience with information

As a motley crew of ex-race team staff, we are used to a plethora of information on a pit wall, which makes racing so much easier to follow. Opening up a lot more of this to the public in an easy to understand way will drive audience engagement. Let the fans see more of what goes on behind the scenes. We think this is the real key to firing up the next generation of engineers.

Embrace sustainability (environmental and financial) where possible

Ditch fuel saving in a race – it is a drop in the ocean, when you consider the huge amount of fuel used in the multitude of trucks, planes, trains and boats it takes to lug the teams around the world. Let’s sort the big stuff first without compromising the racing. Centralise hospitality to cut the carbon footprint. Whilst impressive, these are a huge cost in terms of money, staff and energy. We’re also pro 2-day race weekends; Give the spectators more action for each ticket they buy, and save some hotel money for the teams at the same time. Two free practice sessions and qualifying on Saturday, a warm up and race on Sunday. Yes, bring back Sunday warm up – we aren’t complete killjoys after all!

Posted by and filed under Business news, Formula Student.

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We are very pleased to be working with the Motorsport Industry Association (MIA) and SAHARA Force India Formula One Team to host the ever successful MIA School of Race Engineering in 2016.

The MIA set up the UK’s first and only specialised School of Race Engineering in 2010 to meet requests from motorsport and race team employers who have difficulty finding, and funding, top quality race engineering training. This unique School is open to high-level motorsport students and engineers and trains them in the specialist skills required to be a Race Engineer “on the pit wall” in a real working environment.

The School has established an excellent industry-wide reputation by delivering relevant, up-to-date course content which equips engineers to succeed as race engineers. Such real-time, current, experienced teaching from active, successful professional race engineers is difficult to organise, yet invaluable to the students and future employers.

The courses take place in a classroom environment alongside simulation sessions. Students receive instruction from race engineer tutors who have current on-track experience in major race series – IndyCar, WEC, USC, BGT, BTCC, GP2 and GP3. The School welcomes engineering students, graduates and professionals, all of whom need previous technical knowledge; all non-UK students must be fluent in English.

The MIA fully understands the fast changing demands of race engineering and updates the course content to keep it fresh and relevant. It seeks and secures new tutors skilled in the latest speciality subjects, continuously improving the learning experience. By partnering with the team here at BPS, the school will be incorporating the very latest simulation techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of this vital new component of race engineering – an essential tool which teams use to deliver solutions and results.

Various reports have revealed a skills gap effecting all engineering sectors, the school is aiming to give delegates the best opportunity to ‘hit the ground running’. With 830,000 new science, engineering and technology (SET) professionals and 450,000 SET technicians needed between now and 2020, there has never been a more vital time for high quality engineers.

The Format of the MIA School of Race Engineering

The School takes place over two weekends, during which a maximum of 20 students receive two full days of in-depth tutorial, each weekend. We are hosting part 2 of the course on 3rd & 4th December and SAHARA Force India Formula One Team are hosting part 1 of the course on 26th & 27th November. Many specialised, race engineering subjects are covered in detail – including set-up procedures, vehicle dynamics, data analysis, race simulation, driver communication and race strategy amongst others. On each Saturday evening, a well-known ‘race engineering’ special guest joins students and tutors to share their experience. Detailed course attendance certificates are awarded upon successful completion for use as a valuable reference when seeking employment.

Success of the MIA School of Race Engineering

Many past students have secured jobs in leading race teams, including Red Bull Racing Technology, Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team and Porsche GT, as a direct result of attending the School.

2016 Tutors

The MIA is very proud to have partnered with new tutors for 2016, Andy Brown and Rex Keen. Andy Brown, whose career spans more than 30 years, with direct involvement within a leading Formula One team and four Indianapolis 500 victories and Rex Keen, who has 20 years’ motorsport experience within V8 Supercars, Formula Ford, Formula 3, Sports Cars, Porsche Carrera Cup, BMW Mini Challenge and 24 Hour Endurance races. Both will also be supported by leading engineers from global championships.

The MIA has recently opened registrations, if you think this course would be of value to your career, please do come and join us.

Details on how to register can be found on the MIA School of Race Engineering web page, alternatively, you can contact carly.latcham@the-mia.com at the MIA who would be more than happy to answer any queries.

Figures taken from: https://www.theengineer.co.uk/issues/october-2012-online/report-reveals-scale-of-uks-engineering-skills-shortage/

Posted by and filed under Meet the team.

Mr June is Marc Wood, the one of our latest recruits to the technical team and lead Simulator Engineer.

Marc Wood Base Performance Simulators

How did you come to work at BPS?

After three years working for a international single seater team, I wanted a new challenge and responsibility. I have always been interested in the computing and simulation area of motorsport as it seems to be an increasingly important tool for teams. I saw an ad in Autosport magazine late last year, and joined the growing team here at the start of February.

What does a typical day at BPS entail for you?

Supporting customers around the world, working with drivers of varying experience, and thinking of new solutions to our problems.  I like exploring anything that can make our lives easier and those of our customers.

What do you think makes BPS different to other companies?

It seems like everyone else has said this before, but the friendly atmosphere.  We work really hard and regularly have to drop what we were planning to do to help a customer, so sometimes the days end up being long, but they’ll always be someone around to make you a cup of coffee and help you out when you need it.  It extends to our customers as well – they’ll always be a team by the coffee machine to catch up with.

What is the best day you’ve had at BPS?

Coming from a single seater racing background, it was actually really interesting to spend a day with one of our LMP2 customer teams. I learnt a lot about how you would engineer a sportscar for an endurance race. Although the theory and physics is the same as what I’m used to, setting a car up for multiple drivers over long distances is quite different.  Getting to talk in depth with the team engineer allowed me to understand what they were facing at the track, and then I could make sure that was what they were going to get out of the simulator.

What do you do when you aren’t at work?

I have to confess, I watch a lot of motorsport even after spending all week doing it.  I’ve just become a property owner for the first time in February, so I’ve spent a lot of time on that recently. Hopefully it will be the start of an empire!

What is the one piece of advice you’d give to your 15 year old self?

Make sure you get experience in the industry as early as possible.  It isn’t just about your qualifications in this game.

Quick fire round

Tea or coffee?

Coffee.

Single-seater or GT?

Single-seater.

Favourite track?

Zolder.

Favourite car?

1995 Williams F1 – the car that made me want to work in motorsport.

Favourite workshop radio station?

Spotify.

Posted by and filed under Meet the team.

We move from the workshop into the office for February. Centre stage this month is Emily Hogan. She is in charge of the pennies, pounds and making sure Darren Turner hasn’t lost receipts!

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How did you come to work at BPS?

After graduating with a degree in animation and a work history of sales and administration I developed a late passion for Motorsport. Feeling like an unlikely candidate to work in the industry, I was content to nurture my passion with marshalling and spectating. The advertisement on the BPS website for an administration position was bought to my attention and I saw an opportunity. I was invited for an interview and later offered the job.

What does a typical day at BPS entail for you?

Alongside helping with the general housekeeping, a typical day for me usually entails maintaining the BPS books and general administrative duties. I’m organising, paying, recording and writing invoices, answering phone calls and emails, and booking simulator sessions. As the company keeps growing this becomes a bigger and bigger task!

What do you think makes BPS different to other companies?

BPS is unique to me as an administrator as I am required to be more involved in other areas which I wouldn’t have the chance for in another company. Having the opportunity to meet and hear stories from drivers and people involved is great. I am continuously learning and developing in ways I never imagined I would. Having such friendly and knowledgable colleagues around me who have similar interests but different backgrounds makes the day go quickly.

What is the best day you’ve had at BPS?

It’s hard to define my best day really. From day one this job has been an eye opener and a wonderful welcome to a part of the Motorsport industry. My first time in the GT sim was pretty high up on the experience list.

What do you do when you aren’t at work?

When I’m not at work I am a trainee marshal, mainly at Donington, as well as a spectator of various motorsport events including the Le Mans 24 hour. I am a friend and supporter of the National Memorial Arboretum and I enjoy travelling when I can. Movies, drawing, computer games and baking are also a great way to relax after a day of financial reporting.

What is the one piece of advice you’d give to your 15 year old self?

I would probably say hang in there. You will continue to learn for most your life so relax and don’t put so much pressure on yourself, you’re 15! Enjoy life.

On to the quick fire round

Tea or coffee?

Tea.

Single-seater or GT?

GT.

Favourite track?

Donington or Circuit de la Sarthe.

Favourite car?

Classic Fiat 500/595 Abarth.

Favourite workshop/office radio station?

BBC Radio 2.

Posted by and filed under Business news.

Base Performance Simulators was announced as the winner of the Business of the Year award (with a turnover of under £5m), at the annual Motorsport Industry Association’s (MIA) Business Excellence Awards on 14 January 2016.

The sell-out event, which took place at the Birmingham NEC as part of the world-renowned Autosport International show, saw more than 500 guests from across the globe come together to recognise the achievements of the motorsport industry over the past 12 months.

The Motorsport Industry Association (MIA) is the world’s leading trade association for the motorsport, high performance engineering, and services sectors. It represents the specialised needs of a highly successful industry which, although extending throughout the world and rapidly expanding in the developing nations, is centred here in the UK.

Company founder Darren Turner said: “I was very proud to accept this award. It is a true reflection of the work that Ella Barrington and the whole team at BPS has put in during the last 12 months. 2015 was a record-breaking year in every aspect of the business and it is a source of immense pride for all of us that our efforts have been recognised by others in our industry. ”

MIA CEO, Chris Aylett said: “It is a real privilege to be part of an industry which represents so many world-class organisations and individuals. This year’s winners and finalists have yet again impressed the judges with their innovation and performance. The quality of the entries was incredibly high and we’d like to congratulate the entire motorsport supply chain for the continued passion, drive and commitment to excellence which ensures global renown.”

First presented in 1995, the MIA Business Excellence Awards recognise excellence at all levels within the motorsport and high performance engineering industry.

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Posted by and filed under Customer view, GT, Guest blog.

Just a few weeks ago, I had the privilege of competing in the 24 Hours of Le Mans for the very first time. Heading into the race there was no shortage of drivers telling me what a unique experience Le Mans is, and without a doubt it lived up to the hype. The event is totally overwhelming in every way, from the opening day of scrutineering in the city of Le Mans, to the incredible spectator turnout at the pre-race drivers’ parade, and then the grueling flat-out nature of the actual race itself.

One of the biggest challenges of Le Mans for a rookie driver is coming to grips with the circuit—no small feat when you consider that the Circuit de la Sarthe is 8.47 miles long and features four separate areas where speeds regularly exceed 175mph. To be quick at Le Mans, drivers have to have the confidence to optimize late braking into the chicanes and tight hairpins, inch-perfect car placement to carry the most rolling speed over the punishing curbs, and total commitment in the ultra-high speed Porsche curves where there is absolutely no margin for error.

Le Mans is one of the most difficult circuits I’ve ever encountered for getting up to speed, and the challenge faced by the driver is compounded by the fact that the majority of the circuit is comprised of public roads, so there is no opportunity to do any extra testing in the build-up to the race. Track conditions change frequently during practice, and with such a long lap-time there isn’t much repetition to help find the limits of the car or track.

Sharing the car at Le Mans with two other rookie drivers, I knew that it would be vital to minimize my learning curve in any way that I could, as it was unlikely that any of us would get to run very many laps before starting the race. Fortunately, as advanced motorsports simulation technology has become more readily accessible, I was able to take full advantage. In the weeks prior to flying to France for the race, I logged hours and hours of valuable seat-time around Le Mans from the seat of the GT simulator at GPX Driver Development Lab in Miami, Florida.

Segal-05

There is no question that the time spent in the simulator was a massive contributing factor to my ability to get comfortable at Le Mans almost immediately, but the benefits of modern simulators go far beyond simply getting familiar with the basic layout of the circuit.

At the professional level, it isn’t unusual for an engineer to brief their drivers on an upcoming event by providing a sample data trace of that car and track from the prior year. Typically this would be used to illustrate very basic things like gear selection, braking intensity, and the like.

In my case, I was able to get much more benefit from the data sample provided by integrating it with my simulator sessions. Like this I was able to focus my efforts on trying different driving techniques and approaches to emulate what I saw from the other drivers’ data. By comparing my data output from the GPX Lab simulator with the sample provided by the team, I was able to see very clearly what worked and what didn’t before I ever turned a lap on the actual circuit.

The time spent preparing for Le Mans in the simulator was quickly validated when we hit the track for free practice during race week—though all three drivers in our car were rookies at this race, I definitely had a tangible edge in confidence and time spent getting up to speed. While my teammates were still working up to the limit even through their stints in the first half of the race, it took me less than 10-laps in practice to get within a second of my fastest time for the weekend.

As impressive as it is that the current simulators are highly immersive and lifelike in their feeling and experience for the driver, for me the really exciting part is the ability to integrate professional level data and analysis tools to make the learning process so much more efficient for drivers at any level.

At Le Mans my teammates and I joked that the simulator was a bit of an unfair advantage for me. In the end, we finished 3rd place, which isn’t bad for a couple of rookies. Somehow I’m betting that next year I won’t be the only one on the team looking for an unfair advantage in the simulator—but that’s fine by me as long as we come through with the win!